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Fiber Optic Pigtail - Shenzhen Welink Technology Co., LTD

Shenzhen Welink Technology Co,.LTD. is a high-tech enterprise founded in 2014, mainly serving fiber optic solutions for USA, UK, Canada & all over the world.

E2000 Fiber Optic Pigtail

Capacity: Simplex/Duplex/Multiplex
Dimensions: Variable
Material: Plastic
Design Style: Standard
Adapter Type: E2000
Applications: Fiber Transmission
No.of Cable Entries & Exits:N/A
Color: Yellow/Others
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MU Fiber Optic Pigtail

Capacity: Simplex/Duplex/Multiplex
Dimensions: Variable
Material: Plastic
Design Style: Standard
Adapter Type: MU
Applications: Fiber Transmission
No.of Cable Entries & Exits:N/A
Color: Yellow/Others
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LC Fiber Optic Pigtail

Capacity: Simplex/Duplex/Multiplex
Dimensions: Variable
Material: Plastic
Design Style: Standard
Adapter Type: LC
Applications: Fiber Transmission
No.of Cable Entries & Exits:N/A
Color: Yellow/Others
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FC Fiber Optic Pigtail

Capacity: Simplex/Duplex/Multiplex
Dimensions: Variable
Material: Plastic
Design Style: Standard
Adapter Type: FC
Applications: Fiber Transmission
No.of Cable Entries & Exits:N/A
Color: Yellow/Others
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1. Pigtails introduction

Pigtails are used for splice applications when terminating the outside cable of the plant. It is consists of a connector and a special length of fiber cable. Telcordia GR-326 basis of meetings and ROHS requirements. All OMC pigtails are factory examined and tested, with available interferometer data It is consists of 12pcs of pigtail. 12pcs simplex is one unit. Telcordia GR-326 basis of meetings and ROHS requirements. The connector could be SC, FC, LC, ST, MU, and E2000etc. The cable could be G652D, G655, G657, OM1, OM2, OM3, OM4 etc. The wire size could be 0.25, 0.9, There are 12 colors for your option. 250um and 900um is the same colored, easy to identify and make right to splice. Tight Buffer, Semi-Tight Buffer. Loose buffer is available Characteristics: Low insertion loss, back reflection loss Flexible and easy to strip fiber buffering Identifiable colors of the fiber buffer under all lighting conditions Reduces installation time Avoid improper patching by possible fiber flipping Clean and Scratch-free end face The proportional geometric test applies to normal production. 100% interferometer control is available under special requirement. fiber optical pigtails

2. Connectors types of pigtails

Fiber optic connectors are used to join optic fibers where a connect / disconnect capability is required. Due to the polishing and fitting procedures that can be incorporated into optic connector manufacturing, connectors are often fiber-optic assembled at a supplier's manufacturing facility. However, the assembly and polishing operations involved can be done in the field, for example, to finish long runs on a patch panel. Fiber optic connectors are used in telephone exchanges, for wiring customer installations, and in external plant applications to connect equipment and cables, or to connect crossover cables. Most fiber optic connectors are spring loaded, so the fiber faces are pressed together when the connectors are attached. The resulting glass-to-glass or plastic-to-plastic contact eliminates signal losses that would be caused by an air gap between the bonded fibers. The performance of fiber optic connectors can be quantified by insertion loss and return loss. Measurements of these parameters are now defined in IEC 61753-1. The standard provides five degrees for insertion loss from A (best) to D (worst) and M for multimode. The other parameter is the return loss, with ratings from 1 (best) to 5 (worst). There are a variety of fiber optic connectors available, but SC and LC connectors are the most common connector types on the market. [2] Typical connectors are rated for 500–1,000 mating cycles. [3] The main differences between the types of connectors are the dimensions and the methods of mechanical coupling. In general, organizations will standardize a type of connector, depending on the equipment they commonly use. In many data center applications, small (eg LC) and multi-fiber (eg MTP / MPO) connectors have replaced older and larger styles (eg SC), allowing more fiber ports per unit of rack space. External plant applications may require the connectors be located underground, or on exterior walls or utility poles. In such environments, protective enclosures are often used, which fall into two broad categories: airtight (sealed) and free breathing. Airtight cases prevent moisture and air from entering but, lacking ventilation, they can become hot if exposed to sunlight or other heat sources. Free-breathing enclosures, on the other hand, allow ventilation, but can also take in moisture, insects, and airborne contaminants. Choosing the correct housing depends on the cable and connector type, location, and environmental factors.
Fiber connector types
Short name Long form Coupling type Screw thread Ferrule diameter Standard Typical applications Image
Avio (Avim) Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Screw ? Aerospace and avionics
ADT-UNI Screw ? 2.5 mm Measurement equipment
DMI Diamond Micro Interface[4] Clip n/a 2.5 mm Printed circuit boards
LSH or E-2000 [5] Snap, with light and dust-cap n/a 2.5 mm IEC 61754-15 Telecom, DWDM systems; E2000-Connector.jpg
EC push-pull type n/a IEC 1754-8[6] Telecom and CATV networks
ELIO Bayonet n/a 2.5 mm ABS1379 PC or UPC
ESCON Enterprise Systems Connection Snap (duplex)[1] n/a 2.5 mm IBM mainframe computers and peripherals ESCON connector.jpg
F07 2.5 mm Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) LAN, audio systems; for 200 μm fibers, simple field termination possible, mates with ST connectors
F-3000 Snap, with light and dust-cap n/a 1.25 mm IEC 61754-20 Fiber To The Home (LC Compatible)
FC Ferrule Connector or Fiber Channel[7] Screw M8×0.75[8] 2.5 mm IEC 61754-13[6] Datacom, telecom, measurement equipment, single-mode lasers[9] FCPC 002.jpg
Fibergate Snap, with dust-cap n/a 1.25 mm Backplane connector
FJ Fiber-Jack[10] or Opti-Jack[7] Snap (duplex)[1] n/a 2.5 mm Building wiring, wall outlets
LC Lucent Connector,[7] Little Connector,[11] or Local Connector[11] Snap n/a 1.25 mm IEC 61754-20[6] High-density connections, SFP and SFP+ transceiversXFP transceivers[9] LC-optical-fiber-connector-hdr-0a.jpg
Lucxis 1.25 mm ARINC 801 PC (straight physical contact) or APC (angled physical contact) configurations
LX-5 Snap, with light- and dust-cap n/a IEC 61754-23 High-density connections; rarely used
M12-FO Duplex screw M16 2.5 mm EN 61754-27, ISO/IEC 61754-27 Machine, process and plant engineering. IP-67 dust and water resistant M12 - A.jpg
MIC Media Interface Connector Snap n/a 2.5 mm Fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) FDDI-optical-fiber-connector-hdr-0a.jpg
MPO or MTP Multiple-Fiber Push-On/Pull-off[7] Snap (multiplex push-pull coupling) n/a 2.5×6.4 mm[12] IEC-61754-7;[6] EIA/TIA-604-5 (FOCIS 5) SM or MM multi-fiber ribbon. Same ferrule as MT, but more easily reconnectable.[12] Used for indoor cabling and device interconnections. MTP is a brand name for an improved connector, which intermates with MPO.[13] MPO Stecker HR.jpg
MT Mechanical Transfer Snap (multiplex)[1] n/a 2.5×6.4 mm Pre-terminated cable assemblies; outdoor applications[12] Lwl mtrj.jpg
MT-RJ Mechanical Transfer Registered Jack or Media Termination - recommended jack[7] Snap (duplex)[1] n/a 2.45×4.4 mm IEC 61754-18 Duplex multimode connections Lwl mtrj.jpg
MU Miniature unit[7] Snap n/a 1.25 mm IEC 61754-6 Common in Japan[1]
SC Subscriber connector,[7] square connector[7] or standard connector Snap (push-pull coupling) n/a 2.5 mm IEC 61754-4[6] Datacom and telecom; GPONEPONGBICMADI DSCF0058.JPG
SC-DC/ SC-QC SC-Dual Contact/ SC-Quattro Contact[10] Snap (push-pull coupling; duplex) n/a 2.5 mm IEC 61754-4 Datacom and telecom; GPONEPONGBIC SC-optical-fiber-connector-hdr-0a.jpg
SMA 905F-SMA I Sub Miniature A Screw (also available as a keyed connector) 1/4"-36 UNS 2B 3.17 mm[14] IEC 60874-2 Industrial lasers, optic spectrometers, military; telecom multimode F-SMA-Stecker (SMA 905).jpg
SMA 906F-SMA II Sub Miniature A Screw 1/4"-36 UNS 2B Stepped; typ. 0.118 in (3.0 mm), then 0.089 in (2.3 mm)[citation needed] IEC 60874-2 Industrial lasers, military; telecom multimode
SMC Sub Miniature C Snap n/a 2.5 mm
ST or BFOC Straight Tip[7] or Bayonet Fiber Optic Connector Bayonet n/a 2.5 mm IEC 61754-2[6] Datacom ST-optical-fiber-connector-hdr-0a.jpg
TOSLINK Toshiba Link Snap n/a most common is JIS F05 Digital audio Toslink kabel.jpg
VF-45 Volition Fiber Snap n/a None - V-grooves as guidance Datacom
1053 HDTV Broadcast connector interface Push-pull coupling n/a Industry-standard 1.25 mm diameter ceramic ferrule Audio & Data (broadcasting)
V-PIN V-System Snap (Duplex) Push-pull coupling n/a Industrial and electric utility networking; multimode 200 μm, 400 μm, 1 mm, 2.2 mm fibers

fiber optical patch cords types

3. Fiber pigtails connector analysis

The SMA connector was the first widely used standard connector, developed in the 1970s by Amphenol using the design geometry of the SMA RF connector. [18] It was designed for large diameter multimode fiber applications, for which it is still widely used in industry and medicine. It lacks important features for communications applications, so it is considered obsolete. The floating ferrule of the FC connectors provides good mechanical insulation. FC connectors must be coupled more carefully than push-pull types due to the need to align the key and the risk of scratching the end face of the fiber when inserting the ferrule into the connector. An FC connector should not be used in vibrating environments due to its threaded lock. FC connectors have been replaced in many applications by SC and LC connectors. [one] There are two incompatible standards for key widths in FC / APC and FC / PC connectors that maintain polarization: 2mm (reduced or type R) and 2.14mm (NTT or type N). [19] Connectors and receptacles with different key widths cannot be attached or will not preserve the angular alignment between the fibers, which is especially important to maintain the polarization of the fiber. Some manufacturers mark the reduced keys with a single write mark on the key and mark the NTT connectors with a double write mark. The push-pull design on the SC connectors reduces the possibility of contact damage to the end face of the fiber during connection. These are often found on older network computers that use GBIC. LC connectors have replaced SC connectors in corporate network environments due to their smaller size; they are often found on pluggable small form factor transceivers. ST connectors have a key that prevents rotation of the ceramic ferrule and a bayonet lock similar to a BNC housing. The single index tab must be properly aligned with a slot in the mating receptacle prior to insertion; the bayonet latch can then engage, push and turn, locking at the end of travel that maintains the spring-loaded latching force at the optic core joint. In general, the insertion loss should not exceed 0.75 dB and the return loss should be more than 20 dB. Typical insertion repeatability, the difference in insertion loss between one plug and another, is 0.2 dB. On all connectors, cleaning the ceramic ferrule before each connection helps prevent scratches and extends the life of the connector substantially. The connectors on the polarizing fiber are sometimes marked with a blue strain relief sleeve or connector body. Sometimes a blue protective tube is used on the fiber. [twenty] MT-RJ (Registered Mechanical Transfer Connector) uses a form factor and closure similar to 8P8C (RJ45) connectors. Two separate fibers are included in a unified connector. It is easier to finish and install than ST or SC connectors. [Citation required] Smaller size allows twice the port density on a faceplate as ST or SC connectors. The MT-RJ connector was designed by AMP, but was later standardized as FOCIS 12 (Fiber Optic Connector Interconnection Standards) in EIA / TIA-604-12. There are two variations: fixed and pinless. The plug-in variety, which has two small stainless steel guide pins on the connector face, is used on patch panels to mate with the pinless connectors on MT-RJ patch cords. MPO (Multi-fiber Push On) is a connector for flat cables with four to twenty-four fibers. [21] Singlemode fiber connectors have angled ends to minimize back reflection, while multimode fiber versions often have flat ends. MTP is a mark for a version of the MPO connector with improved specifications. The MTP and MPO connectors are interleaved. Hardened Fiber Optic Connectors (HFOC) and Hardened Fiber Optic Adapters (HFOA) are passive telecommunication components used in an outdoor plant environment. They provide connections to clients from fiber distribution networks. These components can be provided in pedestal locks, [note 1] [22] locks and overhead and underground terminals, or equipment located at customer sites, such as a Fiber Distribution Hub (FDH) or an optic network terminal unit . These connectors, which are field compliant and hardened for use in the OSP, are required to support Fiber Deployment to Facility (FTTP) deployment and service offerings. HFOCs are designed to withstand the weather conditions in the USA. USA, Including rain, flood, snow, sleet, winds [caption id="attachment_2419" align="alignnone" width="600"]fiber optical pigtails types fiber optic pigtails types[/caption]

4. Conclusion of fiber optic pigtails

Since the fiber cable network is built by drawing the long lines of physical cables, it is very impossible to run a continuous cable from end to end. Next comes the fiber braids, one of the bundles of cables, has a connector on one end and a length of exposed fiber on the other end to melt together with the fiber optic cable. By melting the fiberglass cable, you can achieve minimal insertion loss. The pigtails are terminated at one end with a connector, and the other side is usually spliced ​​with OSP (Outside Plant Cable). They can be simple: (single fiber) or multi-fiber up to 144 fibers. Pigtails have both male and female connectors where the male connectors will be used to directly plug in an optic transceiver, while the female connectors mount to a wall or patch panel. Fiber optic pigtails are generally used to make the connection between patch panels in a central office or Head End and an OSP cable. Often times they can also provide a connection to another junction point outside the Head End or central office. The purpose of this is because various jacket materials can only be used within a limited distance within the building. You may confuse the purpose between fiber optic connector, fiber optic patch cord and flexible fiber optic cable. Here we will solve it. The fiber optic connector is used to connect fiber. The use of one or two fiber optic connectors in a cable has two elements with different assistance in fiber optic solutions. Fiber optic patch cords (or called fiber bridges) are used as a connection from a patch panel to a network element. Fiber optic patch cords, thick protective layer, generally used in the connection between the optic transceiver and the terminal box. Fiber optic pigtail called a pigtail line, only one end of the connector, while the other end is a decapitation of the cable core. Solder and connection to another core of fiber optic cable, often appear on the fiber optic terminal box, which is used to connect the fiber optic cable, etc. Fiber optic cable can be terminated on a crossover patch panel using either flexible connector or flexible connector fiber termination techniques. The pigtail approach requires that a splice be made and a splice tray be used on the patch panel. The flexible cable approach provides the best quality connection and is usually the fastest. Fiber pigtails have premium connectors and typical 0.9mm outer diameter cables. Simplex fiber pigtails and duplex fiber pigtails are available, with different cable colors, cable diameter and optional jacket types. The most common is known as flexible cable fusion splice, this is easily done in the field with a multi-fiber trunk to break the multi-fiber cable into its component for connection to the final equipment. And the 12-fiber or 6-fiber multi-color pigtail are easy to install and provide a superior quality fiber optic connection. Fiber optic pigtails can have various types of fiber optic terminations such as SC, FC, ST, LC, MU, MT-RJ, MTP, MPO, etc. Pigtails offer low insertion loss and low posterior reflection. They are specially designed for high count fiber optic fusion splices. Pigtails are often purchased in pairs to connect to endpoints or other fiber runs with patch cords.

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